Sunday, April 7, 2013

Seafaring Sunday: "A Desperate Fight"

Captain Barry was given command of Lexington, of 14 guns, on 7 December 1775. The Lexington sailed 31 March 1776. On 7 April 1776, off the Capes of Virginia, he fell in with the Edward, tender to the British man-of-war Liverpool, and after a desperate fight of one hour and twenty minutes captured her and brought her into Philadelphia. Barry continued in command of Lexington until 18 October 1776, and captured several private armed vessels during that time.

~ from Naval History and Heritage Command's biography of Commodore John Barry

Header: Commodore John Barry USN by Gilbert Stuart via Wikipedia

6 comments:

Timmy! said...

Huzzah! for Commodore John Barry, Pauline!

Pauline said...

Also, that's a pretty Irish lookin' Irishman right there...

Duncan Bond said...

Hey Pauline, I've just come across your blog, love it.

I am a partner in the Cornish Tea Company, we produce a blend called Smugglers Brew, we are always looking for interesting stuff to put on our boxes, do you have any interesting stuff on smuggling tea, or photos! We would happily promote your blog too.

Duncan bond

Duncan@cornish-tea.co.uk

Pauline said...

Duncan: Good to meet you and thank you.

I don't have a whole lot on tea smuggling off the top of my head, but I know it went on during the Revolution at the very least, particularly in the West Indies. Let me see what I can dig up and I'll get back to you.

Also, I'm asking the Brethren to chime in if they've any good leads for our new mate!

Calliope Street said...

Great portrait of Commodore Barry. As a parochial school Catholic kid growing up in NYC, I learned all about him from the nuns. The American Revolution was fought and won almost entirely by Catholics, you know. It's a fact. You can ask Sister Eunice Marie.

Pauline said...

Ha! I've no doubt that history looked just like that through Sister's glasses. I've also no doubt that she wore glasses!